When the people meant to protect us…

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In her first poem, Aja Monet tackled the question: why do we write?

Aja Monet was in class at Baruch College Campus High School in Manhattan when a terror attack brought down the World Trade Center. The day awakened her to the “interconnectedness” of people and brought her a new perspective on her place in the world, she said.

“For me, language was always about trying to articulate my own truth,” she said. “It was the beginning of me starting to feel valuable in the human narrative.”

Monet, a Brooklyn-based poet of Cuban and Jamaican descent, soon began writing and performing with the organization Urban Word NYC and performing in talent shows at her high school. In 2007, she became the youngest-ever poet to win the Nuyorican Poets Café Grand Slam Champion at the age of 19.

READ FULL PIECE ON PBS NEWSHOUR HERE

AJA MONET USES POETRY AS A TOOL TO PROTEST VIOLENCE AND RACIAL INJUSTICE

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Last month, during a rally in Union Square, poet Aja Monet took the podium dressed entirely in black, looking somber and resolute like a woman in mourning. A banner fluttered in the wind behind her head as she gripped the microphone, a flag adorned by photographs of the black women and girls who have lost their lives to police violence over the years. “I am a woman carrying other women in my mouth,” she began, her voice forceful and clear. “Behold a sister, a daughter, a mother, dear friend.”

But as Monet reached the crescendo of her poem in which she calls out the names of the dead — Rekia Boyd, Tanisha Anderson, Yvette Smith, Aiyana Jones, Kayla Moore, Shelly Frey and countless others — that voice started to tremble and shake.

READ FULL ARTICLE & WATCH VIDEO HERE!

Poet Aja Monet Confronts Police Brutality Against Black Women With #SayHerName

“Melissa Williams,” Aja Monet reads, “Darnisha Harris.” Her voice is strong; it marches along, but it shakes a little, although not from nerves. She’s performing a poem that includes the forgotten names of girls and women who’ve been injured or killed by the police. She finishes forcefully, then pauses, exhales. “Can I do that again?” she asks. “It’s my first time reading it out loud, and … ” she trails off.

Monet had written the poem — a contribution to the #SayHerName campaign, a necessary CONTINUATION of the Black Lives Matter movement focusing on overlooked police violence against women — earlier that morning. That evening, she’d read it at a vigil. Now, she was practicing on camera, surprised by the power of her own words.

As a poet, Monet is prolific. She’s been performing both music and readings for some time — at 19, she was the youngest ever WINNER of New York City’s Nuyorican Poet’s Café Grand Slam — and her work has brought her to France, Bermuda and Cuba, from where her grandmother fled, and where she recently learned she still has extended family. Next month, she’ll return to visit them. But first, she wants to contribute to a campaign she believes in.

Though she’s disheartened that a hashtag is necessary to capture people’s attention — “I think #SayHerName is the surface LEVEL of the issues but beneath that there is the real question of, ‘Why?’” she says — Monet wields her art to achieve social and political justice. While discussing political poetry with a fellow artist in Palestine, he observed, “Art is more political than politics.” “I feel him,” she says. “I think he’s right.”

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Writers Weekend at Summerville

  • Sat
    18
    Apr
    2015

    Writer's Weekend at Summerville

    10am Now in its third year, Writers Weekend at Summerville, a conference for emerging writers, is an event designed to bring together emerging and established voices who share a love of and passion for reading and writing. Participants will learn from award-winning authors who will discuss elements of craft and share their published creative nonfiction, fiction and poetry. GRU faculty and local writers will also lead writing workshops for attendees seeking community and feedback. In addition, creative writing students will read from their work and discuss their experiences in the Creative Writing PROGRAM at GRU. Former PRESENTERS at THE CONFERENCE include Jerico Brown, Bronwen Dickey, Eric Smith, Michel Stone, Susan Tekulve, and Deno Trakas. http://gru.edu/colleges/pamplin/efl/writersweekend/ Screen Shot 2015-04-09 at 1.23.56 PM

Westchester Poetry Festival

  • Sat
    11
    Apr
    2015

    Westcheser Poetry Festival

    1pm-5:30pm

    Aja Monet will deliver the keynote reading at the fifth annual Westchester Poetry Festival scheduled on Saturday, April 11. Joining Ms. Monet are the acclaimed poets Sally Bliumis-Dunn, Suzanne Cleary, Katy Lederer, and Matthew Thornburn, along with a host of talented student poets from The Masters School.

    The festival will begin at 1:00 pm at the historic Estherwood Mansion on the campus of The Masters School in Dobbs Ferry, NY. Come on over and don’t come alone – spouses, partners, and high school students are all welcome. And don’t forget to pass along this invitation to all your Facebook friends! The festival is open to the public; admission and parking are free of charge. Questions? Call 914-479-6419.

    We’re looking forward to celebrating poetry and the spoken word with you. Come join us on April 11!

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